Displaying items by tag: Nuclear Power

British and Japanese anti-nuclear campaigners will demonstrate together in London on Saturday 15th March to commemorate the third anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan. See  full details below.

The demonstration will coincide with events taking place around the world to highlight the legacy of the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant and to call for an end to nuclear power.

CND’s General Secretary, Kate Hudson said:

‘Japanese officials have come clean that 160,000 people who were displaced in the wake of the disaster may never return to their homes.’

‘The area remains a wasteland, where contamination is seeping out quicker than Tepco can control it. Miles O’Brien, a science correspondent, who recently visited the site, described it as “a post-apocalyptic landscape of abandoned towns, frozen in time”. The decontamination operation – overseen by Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) – is expected to last at least 30 years.’

‘Three years on, it is both a moral obligation and a logical conclusion to heed the lessons of the Fukushima disaster. Nuclear power has shown itself to be a dirty, dangerous and expensive form of energy. Instead of subsidising nuclear power and building new reactors, we call on the British Government to get serious about renewable energy.’

‘Without a genuine commitment – shown through vastly increased funding for research, development and green energy infrastructure – this government’s superficial commitment to, in David Cameron’s words, “green crap”, is just that.’

Event Details

March on Parliament and Rally
12:30pm, Saturday 15th March 
Hyde Park Corner to Parliament

Meet: 12:30pm by Hyde Park Corner tube station, near the “Hyde Park” exit.
March via Japanese Embassy and offices of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO – the owners of Fukushima) to Parliament.

Rally: 3:00–4:30pm at Old Palace Yard, opposite House of Lords. Attendees include fashion designer Katharine Hamnett, Samarendra Das, Fukushima evacuees. There will also be music, singing, a human chain and a die-in.

Events organised jointly by CND, Kick Nuclear and Japanese Against Nuclear (UK)  

For further info, contact David Polden (London Region CND) on   david.lrcnd@cnduk.org or on 020 7607 2302

For information in Japanese, see   http://www.januk.org/

Published in Nuclear Power
Thursday, 07 November 2013 14:44

CND criticises Hinkley subsidy deal

CND has criticised the government's announcement last month of a deal to subsidise the building of a new nuclear power station at the Hinkley site in Somerset. The government will guarantee a 'strike price' of £92.50 for every megawatt hour of energy produced from new nuclear plants. If the market price falls below this amount then a surcharge will be added to customers' bills. This figure is twice the level of today's wholesale energy price, and may increase even more, taking into account inflation.

CND General Secretary Kate Hudson commented at the time:
"The 2010 Coalition Agreement explicitly states that there will be 'no public subsidy' for new nuclear power and yet the deal announced today commits taxpayers' money to bailing out an industry which has proven time and time again that it does not offer value for money. The plant operators face no economic risk, as nuclear power is given a special advantage over other forms of electricity, most notably renewables. The agreement today also risks breaching EU law on state aid, with the European Commission set to investigate the deal. Instead of subsidising nuclear energy production, the government should be investing more in safe, clean and affordable renewable energy."

The deal has been criticised by politicians, energy experts and political commentators. The Guardian pointed out the failed past promises of the nuclear industry and the falling cost of renewable energy compared to the price agreed for nuclear power. The Economist called the 'pricey' deal a 'dicey investment'. Renewable Energy World published information showing how the rates offered for nuclear power from 2023 are much higher than what solar and wind power currently cost, and these prices are guaranteed to fall in the next ten years.

The Mirror reported that city analysts were describing the deal as 'economically insane'. Even the Liberal Democrat President, Tim Farron, publicly questioned the deal. Academics, including Professor Steve Thomas of Greenwich University, have argued that nuclear power stations usually face delays and rocketing costs.

An Taisce, Ireland's equivalent of the National Trust of Ireland, has launched a legal challenge against the project. It says the Irish people should have been consulted, pointing out that the proposed plant is as close to the Irish coast as it is to London and closer to Dublin than it is to Leeds. The case will be heard on December 5th in the High Court in London.

The announcement is not legally binding, with EDF yet to make a final investment decision on the project. Chinese companies China National Nuclear Corporation and China General Nuclear Power Corporation will be minority shareholders. EDF will not give the go ahead for contractors to build the plant until the deal has received state aid clearance from the European Commission, which could take several months or even a year. The Commission has confirmed it will examine the deal once it receives formal notification from the UK government. The National Audit Office has also confirmed it will investigate.

Published in Nuclear Power news
Monday, 21 October 2013 10:46

CND criticises nuclear subsidy deal

CND has criticised the government's announcement of a deal to subsidise the building of a new nuclear power station at the Hinkley site in Somerset. The government will guarantee a 'strike price' of £92.50 for every megawatt hour of energy produced from new nuclear plants. If the market price falls below this amount then a surcharge will be added to customers' bills. This would be the first new nuclear power station to be built in the UK since 1995.

CND General Secretary Kate Hudson commented:

"The 2010 Coalition Agreement explicitly states that there will be 'no public subsidy' for new nuclear power and yet the deal announced today commits taxpayers' money to bailing out an industry which has proven time and time again that it does not offer value for money. The plant operators face no economic risk, as nuclear power is given a special advantage over other forms of electricity, most notably renewables. The agreement today also risks breaching EU law on state aid, with the European Commission set to investigate the deal.

"Instead of subsidising nuclear energy production, the government should be investing more in safe, clean and affordable renewable energy."

Published in Press Releases
Monday, 16 September 2013 15:38

CND challenges new child cancer study

The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) has challenged a new study which claims that children living near nuclear power plants in the UK do not have an increased risk of developing leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The Bithell et al study for the British Journal of Cancer identified 10 cases of children under five near nuclear power stations who had been diagnosed with leukaemia or similar cancers. CND Council Member Dr Ian Fairlie, an independent consultant on radioactivity in the environment, believes there are problems with the new study. He has contacted the author of the study to answer his concerns on many methodological issues.

Dr Fairlie commented:

“There is a discrepancy between the study’s observed number of diagnosed cases and the larger number of cases found in a previous major UK government study, which even had a shorter monitoring period. There are several technical points which are problematic.  The authors themselves admit their findings are not statistically significant. Furthermore, the results of the British Journal of Cancer study are inconsistent with the very large number of studies which show the very opposite – that living near nuclear power stations does increase the risk of cancer.

“In particular, the results conflict with the very powerful German KiKK study from 2008, which found increased risks.  Its evidence and that of many other studies pose difficult questions, not least whether the UK government should be rethinking its nuclear policies. This latest study does not do anything to silence these concerns.”

CND General Secretary Kate Hudson commented:

“Nuclear power is not only an expensive form of energy, it is also dangerous and unhealthy. The large majority of over 60 studies world-wide have shown links between living near nuclear power stations and cancer. This latest study is littered with unresolved issues that do nothing to show that the radiation from nuclear power is safe.  Instead of subsidising nuclear energy production, the government should be investing more in safe, clean and affordable renewable energies.”

For an interim analysis of the Bithell et al study, please see Dr Ian Fairlie’s blog: http://www.ianfairlie.org/news/leukemias-near-nuclear-power-stations-new-study-by-bithell-et-al-september-2013/

Published in Nuclear Power

The following is a press release from the Stop Hinkley campaign in response to today's granting of planning permission to EDF for the new reactor at Hinkley Point.

Hinkley C decision 'a political scandal' say local campaigners

Local campaigners say that today's decision to grant planning permission for EDF's Hinkley C project is no surprise, but does nothing to answer the serious questions which now hang over the project.

'I don't think anyone in West Somerset believed that the public consultation last year was anything more than an elaborate, undemocratic sham, and that in itself is a political scandal,' said Theo Simon of the Stop Hinkley campaign. 'Today's decision is a rubber-stamping exercise, but it doesn't change the facts on the ground. EDF don't know what they will do with the radioactive waste Hinkley C would produce, they don't have the investment they need now that Centrica have pulled out, and they have threatened to walk away unless the government underwrites their costs and fixes the nuclear electricity price artificially high for consumers.'

'No other business in this country would get planning permission without a waste management plan, and this industry produces the most hazardous waste known to humankind. David Cameron promised there would be no new nuclear without a solution to the waste issue, but today Ed Davey has granted EDF permission regardless. Cameron also promised there would be no public subsidy, but now his government is negotiating precisely that, and apparently willing to lock us all into paying double the original price quoted for nuclear, for the next 35 years!'

'If the billions the government are prepared to commit to keeping EDF in profit were spent on creating jobs in renewables, energy efficiency and home insulation, we could cut our energy bills AND create thousands of sustainable jobs. Off-shore wind is now set to deliver power cheaper than nuclear by 2020, when the government says we will have the "energy gap" that justifies new nuclear. But with the best will in the world, Hinkley C could not now start generating till the mid 20s. EDF's other new reactors in Europe are now many years over schedule and many billions over budget.'

'It's becoming apparent to everyone but the government that the nuclear emperor has no clothes. It makes no sense financially, environmentally or in terms of our energy needs. It's time to put it out of its misery and save the government any further embarrassment. We need clean green 21st century solutions to 21st century problems, not a toxic white elephant only kept alive by government bailouts and inflated electricity bills.'

For more information, contact: Theo Simon, Stop Hinkley Campaign, 07455 325 961

Published in Nuclear Power news
Thursday, 07 March 2013 10:40

Remember Fukushima: Two Years On

'Two years on from the tragic events of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan - and the resultant disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant - we owe it to the victims and to ourselves to reject this dangerous and expensive energy form.' - Kate Hudson, CND General Secretary.

Join us from 9th - 11th March for a series of events to commemorate the Fukushima meltdown and to say no to nuclear power!

For further details please see the poster below and www.fukushima2013.com

Remember Fukushima

Published in Nuclear Power

Anti-nuclear protesters this morning carried out a dawn blockade of EDF energies nuclear sites at Hinkley Point in Somerset. The protesters successfully blocked the main access road, meaning that workers were locked out and further ground work on the site of the proposed Hinkley C plant could not go ahead.

Stop Hinkley spokesperson Theo Simon said, "We support this protest. New nuclear is dead in the water. We need public investment in a renewables revolution which could create a million climate jobs and cut energy bills through a programme of home insulation and energy-efficiency. With its massive marine energy resource, West Somerset is perfectly placed to lead the way in renewables, but EDF's plans would turn it into a toxic waste dump for our grandchildren."

Sitting beneath a banner saying 'Nuclear Power - not worth the risk' Bristol tree-surgeon Zoe Smith said, "We want the destruction of land at the proposed Hinkley C site to stop. EDF still don't have planning permission for the new nuclear plant, the government's energy policy is in tatters. With Centrica pulling out and the long awaited Electricity Reform Act delayed, there is not even enough investment to finish the project. If the Tories fix the electricity price for nuclear so that the project can go ahead it will leave a radioactive waste dump here for hundreds of years."

Nikki Clark from South West Against Nuclear said, "Not only do we not need new nuclear, we certainly don't need to extend the life of the existing reactors even further. Just this year alone reactor No.4 in the B station has scrammed at least three times. EDF like to call these emergency shutdowns 'unplanned outages' but this deliberately conceals the fact that these ageing reactors are now in a dangerous condition."

"In 2008 the regulators threatened British Energy with closure of the site. The reactors do not have any fewer cracks in the graphite core now than they did then. Do we have to have our own Fukushima here in Somerset before we abandon this insanity and embrace a renewables revolution in the UK?"

Published in Nuclear Power news

The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), together with South Asia Solidarity Group, is hosting a public meeting in the House of Commons tonight on the future of nuclear power plants.

At a time when many other countries are turning away from nuclear power, the British government is looking to build two new nuclear reactors at Hinkley Point. Moreover, Britain continues to export civil nuclear technology to India, a country with an abysmal industrial safety record.

Serious concerns over nuclear power have sparked mass protest in both Britain and India demonstrating the depth of opposition to new nuclear power plants. This month has seen hundreds of protesters converge on the proposed site of two new nuclear 'mega-reactors' at Hinkley Point in Somerset. While in Kudankulam, India – a tsunami- and earthquake-prone zone – a non-violent mass movement continues to resist the commissioning of a nuclear power plant which violates the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety guidelines.

Global solidarity between people resisting nuclear power plants is essential.

CND General Secretary Kate Hudson stated:

"Protests against nuclear power in the UK, India, Japan and Germany – and many other countries – show the scale of global public opinion against this dangerous and expensive form of energy. The mass non-violent protests in Kudankulam in India and the repeated demonstrations at Hinkley Point in the UK are powerful expressions of the widespread rejection of nuclear power that governments around the world would do well to heed."

"Rather than pumping subsidies into nuclear energy, governments should be seriously investing in a sustainable energy policy based on renewable sources. If the lessons of Chernobyl and Fukushima are not learned, then governments are inviting further disasters."

Speakers include: Caroline Lucas MP, Kate Hudson (CND), Amrit Wilson (South Asia Solidarity Group), Dr Frank Boulton (Medact) and a speaker from People's Movement Against Nuclear Energy, Kudankulam (via internet).

Details:

NO MORE FUKUSHIMAS! NO MORE CHERNOBYLS! NO NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN BRITAIN AND INDIA!

Public Meeting, House of Commons, Committee Room 6

6:30 - 8:00pm, Thursday 18 October

Free of charge and open to the general public

Published in Nuclear Power

Hundreds of protesters converged on the proposed site of two new nuclear 'mega-reactors' at Hinkley Point in Somerset over the weekend.

Following a march through Bridgwater on Saturday, a rally was held with speakers including CND's Kate Hudson and a specialist engineer who has worked at the nuclear plant for almost thirty years. The engineer decried safety procedures across the nuclear industry and said that a disaster similar to Fukushima was "inevitable" in the UK.

Today a mass trespass on the site was carried out, with more than 50 protesters scaling the fences and scattering symbolic wild flower seeds in order to 'reclaim' the land. Green Party Leader Natalie Bennett was also in attendance to support the actions of the protesters. There have been at least 8 arrests so far and others are still known to be on the site of the proposed reactors.

CND's General Secretary Kate Hudson said:

"At a time when investors from China, France and Russia are pulling out of nuclear power deals across the UK, the government must acknowledge the dead-end represented by this dangerous and excessively-subsidised energy form. We should be investing in renewable energies, not pouring billions into a dirty energy source without a future."

"The actions at Hinkley Point over the weekend show the strength of opposition to nuclear power – and it's time the government got in step with public opinion in the UK and across the world."

Published in Nuclear Power

Hinkley Point demonstration (10th March 2012)This weekend saw the UK commemorate the first anniversary of the Fukushima disaster with the country’s largest anti-nuclear power protest in decades. 

On Saturday 10th March, over 1,000 demonstrators surrounded the site at Hinkley Point in Somerset, where EDF Energy is seeking to build a new mega-reactor. A 24-hour blockade was also successfully carried out, with over 100 building a mini tent city around the facility.

Joining the demonstration, coordinated by the Stop New Nuclear alliance, were leading environmentalists Jonathan Porritt and Caroline Lucas MP, leader of the Green Party. They spoke alongside Kate Hudson, General Secretary of CND, to commemorate the disaster at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant and to call on the government to halt its plans to build eight new nuclear power stations.

Caroline Lucas MP addresses demonstrators

The weekend's events received excellent press coverage, with reports by the Press Association, BBC, Bloomberg, the Morning Star, MSN news and many local and regional outlets. For further press coverage, click here.


Published in News
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